jashnetwork:

DECKER: EPISODE 2 starring, written, directed & produced by Tim Heidecker, featuring Joe Estevez

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NX_MsOPxqzs&list=UUgPClNr5VSYC3syrDUIlzLw

herzogbaby:

Mauvais Sang/The Night is Young directed by Leos Carax (1986)- Carax’s Holy Motors was one of my favourite films of 2012 but everything I’ve seen of his since has failed to resonate with me as much as that film. Mauvais Sang is probably the one to get closest to my appreciation of Holy Motors but even it is not quite there. Michel Piccoli stars as an aging gangster stricken by fear who ropes in a young Denis Lavant (a son of a dead cohort) to help with a heist. While staying with Piccoli, Lavant becomes drawn to Piccoli’s young mistress played by Juliette Binoche. Carax seems to pick up where Godard left off with Breathless. There’s a relentless and wild energy to the film that plays with the tropes of gangster films while also making the gangster film both absurd and beautiful. Carax jumps from the kineticism of frantic but controlled handheld camerawork to static close-ups and composed shots, and more, which makes it a whirlwind of style. Denis Lavant brings his own unique energy too. He’s always great to watch because of how he moves and here that’s put to great use, one scene in particular of him running and thrashing to Bowie’s Modern Love got me pumped ‘cause he really match’s the energy of the song. On top of everything it’s also kind of a sci-fi film with a virus that attacks those who have sex without love and other odd additions. All the little oddities and film references never really distracted from the film though, if anything they just enhanced the powerful bond between Binoche and Levant as they are so unfazed by the madness due to being consumed by each other. Regardless of how much I end up enjoying the film I think I’ll always come away from a Carax film feeling fulfilled in some way. Mauvais Sang is sweepingly romantic, visually electric, and wonderfully lyrical. It takes so many elements of stories we have seen before and crafts them into something completely unique and original, which isn’t too dissimilar from Holy Motors after all.

(Source: best-of-imgur, via thebandhaim)

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 
It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 

It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

theonion:

Scientists: Rich People, Poor People May Have Shared Common Ancestor

yeahwriters:

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

This is like the Story Beginnings Bible.

(via markdeham)

Emilia Clarke in the Game of Thrones S4 bloopers

(Source: leaveatrail, via thebandhaim)

Indian boy with rare condition has 232 ‘teeth’ removed

breakingnews:

image

A 17-year-old boy in India is recovering after having 232 “teeth-like structures” removed from his mouth in what officials believe could be a world record operation

Read more here

dailyactress:

Charisma Carpenter tweets a nude for her 44th birthday

dailyactress:

Charisma Carpenter tweets a nude for her 44th birthday

4gifs:

[video]

4gifs:

[video]

(Source: 4GIFs.com, via wyattface)